Salvador Dali on Freud, Dreams and Aviation

We have learned, thanks to Freud, the symbolic significance charged with a well determined erotic meaning that characterises everything relating to aviation, and especially to its origins. Nothing, indeed, is clearer than the paridisial significance of dreams of “flight”, which in the unconscious mythology of our epoch only mask that frenzied and puerile illusion of “the conquest of the sky”, the “conquest of paradise” incarnated in the messianic character of elementary ideologies (in which the airplane takes the place of a new divinity), and in the same way that we have just studied in the individual pre-dream the frightful fall that awakens us with a start – as a brutal recall of the precise moment of our birth – so we find in the pre-dream of the present day those parachute jumps which I affirm without any fear of being mistaken are nothing other than the dropping from heaven of the veritable rain of newborn children provoked by the war of 1914, nothing other than the fall of all those who, unable to surmount the frightful traumatism of their first birth, desperately attempt to hurl themselves into the void, with the infantile desire to be reborn at all costs, “and in another way”, all the while remaining attached to the umbilical cord which holds them suspended to the silk placenta of their maternal parachute

Salvador Dali (from his autobiography The Secret Life of Salvador Dali)

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NB: featured image from artsology.com. Dali painting – ‘Allegory of an American Christmas'(1934)

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